2022 Presidents Cup: Round Five Results and Notes

 

Sunday, September 25, 2022

Quail Hollow Club (Charlotte, North Carolina)

 

Overall Score: United States 17½, International 12½

R1 (Foursomes): United States 4, International 1

R2 (Four-ball): United States 4, International 1

R3 (Foursomes): United States 2, International 2

R4 (Four-ball): International 3, United States 1

R5 (Singles): United States 6½, International 5½

 

Things to Know

 

Round Five (Sunday) – Singles 

Match 19: Si Woo Kim (INT) def. Justin Thomas (U.S.), 1-up

Match 20: Jordan Spieth (U.S.) def. Cam Davis (INT), 4 and 3

Match 21: Sam Burns (U.S.) and Hideki Matsuyama (INT) tied

Match 22: Patrick Cantlay (U.S.) def. Adam Scott (INT), 3 and 2

Match 23: Sebastian Munoz (INT) def. Scottie Scheffler (U.S.), 2 and 1

Match 24: Tony Finau (U.S.) def. Taylor Pendrith (INT), 3 and 1

Match 25: Xander Schauffele (U.S.) def. Corey Conners (INT), 1-up

Match 26: Sungjae Im (INT) def. Cameron Young (U.S.), 1-up 

Match 27: K.H. Lee (INT) def. Billy Horschel (U.S.), 3 and 1

Match 28: Max Homa (U.S.) def. Tom Kim (INT), 1-up

Match 29: Collin Morikawa (U.S.) def. Mito Pereira (INT), 3 and 2

Match 30: Christiaan Bezuidenhout (INT) def. Kevin Kisner (U.S.), 2 and 1

 

Previous rounds

Round One (Thursday) – Foursomes – United States 4, International 1

Match 1: Patrick Cantlay/Xander Schauffele (U.S.) def. Adam Scott/Hideki Matsuyama (INT), 6 and 5

Match 2: Jordan Spieth/Justin Thomas (U.S.) def. Sungjae Im/Corey Conners (INT), 2 and 1

Match 3: Cameron Young/Collin Morikawa (U.S.) def. Tom Kim/K.H. Lee (INT), 2 and 1

Match 4: Si Woo Kim/Cam Davis (INT) def. Scottie Scheffler/Sam Burns (U.S.), 2-up

Match 5: Tony Finau/Max Homa (U.S.) def. Taylor Pendrith/Mito Pereira (INT), 1-up

 

Round Two (Friday) – Four-ball – United States 4, International 1

Match 6: Jordan Spieth/Justin Thomas (U.S.) def. Adam Scott/Cam Davis (INT), 2 and 1

Match 7: Scottie Scheffler/Sam Burns (U.S.) and Sungjae Im/Sebastian Munoz (INT) tied

Match 8: Kevin Kisner/Cameron Young (U.S.) and Mito Pereira/Christiaan Bezuidenhout (INT) tied

Match 9: Patrick Cantlay/Xander Schauffele (U.S.) def. Hideki Matsuyama/Tom Kim (INT), 3 and 2

Match 10: Billy Horschel/Max Homa (U.S.) def. Corey Conners/Taylor Pendrith (INT), 1-up

 

Round Three (Saturday a.m.) – Foursomes – United States 2, International 2

Match 11: Jordan Spieth/Justin Thomas (U.S.) def. Sungjae Im/Corey Conners (INT), 4 and 3

Match 12: Adam Scott/Hideki Matsuyama (INT) def. Cameron Young/Collin Morikawa (U.S.), 3 and 2

Match 13: K.H. Lee/Tom Kim (INT) def. Scottie Scheffler/Sam Burns (U.S.), 2 and 1

Match 14: Tony Finau/Max Homa (U.S) def. Si Woo Kim/Cam Davis (INT), 4 and 3

 

Round Four (Saturday p.m.) – Four-ball – International 3, United States 1
Match 15: 
Si Woo Kim/Tom Kim (INT) def. Patrick Cantlay/Xander Schauffele (U.S.), 1-up 

Match 16: Justin Thomas/Jordan Spieth (U.S.) def. Hideki Matsuyama/Taylor Pendrith (INT), 4 and 3

Match 17: Sungjae Im/Sebastian Munoz (INT) def. Tony Finau/Kevin Kisner (U.S.), 3 and 2

Match 18: Adam Scott/Cam Davis (INT) def. Billy Horschel/Sam Burns (U.S.), 1-up

 

Players with undefeated records (4)

 

Match 19: Si Woo Kim (INT) def. Justin Thomas (U.S.), 1-up

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Si Woo Kim

4-3-0

3-1-0

1-1-0

Justin Thomas

10-3-2

4-1-0

0-3-0

 

Match 20: Jordan Spieth (U.S.) def. Cam Davis (INT), 4 and 3

R1 (Foursomes): Jordan Spieth/Justin Thomas (U.S.) def. Sungjae Im/Corey Conners (INT), 2 and 1

R2 (Four-ball): Jordan Spieth/Justin Thomas (U.S.) def. Adam Scott/Cam Davis (INT), 2 and 1

R3 (Foursomes): Jordan Spieth/Justin Thomas (U.S.) def. Sungjae Im/Corey Conners (INT), 4 and 3

R4 (Four-ball): Justin Thomas/Jordan Spieth (U.S.) def. Hideki Matsuyama/Taylor Pendrith (INT), 4 and 3

R5 (Singles) Jordan Spieth (U.S.) def. Cam Davis (INT), 4 and 3

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Jordan Spieth

13-5-1

5-0-0

1-3-0

Cam Davis

2-3-0

2-3-0

0-1-0

 

Match 21: Sam Burns (U.S.) and Hideki Matsuyama (INT) tied

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Sam Burns

0-3-2

0-3-2

0-0-1

Hideki Matsuyama

7-10-5

1-3-1

2-1-2

 

Match 22: Patrick Cantlay (U.S.) def. Adam Scott (INT), 3 and 2

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Patrick Cantlay

6-3-0

3-1-0

2-0-0

Adam Scott

18-25-6

2-3-0

5-5-0

 

Match 23: Sebastian Munoz (INT) def. Scottie Scheffler (U.S.), 2 and 1

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Sebastian Munoz

2-0-1

2-0-1

1-0-0

Scottie Scheffler

0-3-1

0-3-1

0-1-0

 

Match 24: Tony Finau (U.S.) def. Taylor Pendrith (INT), 3 and 1

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Tony Finau

3-2-3

3-1-0

1-0-1

Taylor Pendrith

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-1-0

 

Match 25: Xander Schauffele (U.S.) def. Corey Conners (INT), 1-up

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Xander Schauffele

6-3-0

3-1-0

2-0-0

Corey Conners

0-4-0

0-4-0

0-1-0

 

Match 26: Sungjae Im (INT) def. Cameron Young (U.S.), 1-up

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Sungjae Im

4-3-2

1-2-1

2-0-0

Cameron Young

1-2-1

1-2-1

0-1-0

 

Match 27: K.H. Lee (INT) def. Billy Horschel (U.S.), 3 and 1

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

K.H. Lee

2-1-0

2-1-0

1-0-0

Billy Horschel

1-2-0

1-2-0

0-1-0

 

 

Match 28: Max Homa (U.S.) def. Tom Kim (INT), 1-up

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Max Homa

4-0-0

4-0-0

1-0-0

Tom Kim

2-3-0

2-3-0

0-1-0

 

Match 29: Collin Morikawa (U.S.) def. Mito Pereira (INT), 3 and 2

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Collin Morikawa

2-1-0

2-1-0

1-0-0

Mito Pereira

0-2-1

0-2-1

0-1-0

 

Match 30: Christiaan Bezuidenhout (INT) def. Kevin Kisner (U.S.), 2 and 1

 

Updated Presidents Cup records

Player

Overall

2022

Singles

Christiaan Bezuidenhout

1-0-1

1-0-1

1-0-0

Kevin Kisner

2-2-3

0-2-1

0-1-1

 

Records for the week

International Team

Points

Overall

Foursomes

Four-ball

Singles

*Si Woo Kim

3

3-1-0

1-1-0

1-0-0

1-0-0

Sungjae Im

2-2-1

0-2-0

1-0-1

1-0-0

*Sebastian Munoz

2-0-1

0-0-0

1-0-1

1-0-0

*Cam Davis

2

2-3-0

1-1-0

1-1-0

0-1-0

Tom Kim

2

2-3-0

1-1-0

1-1-0

0-1-0

*K.H. Lee

2

2-1-0

1-1-0

0-0-0

1-0-0

Adam Scott

2

2-3-0

1-1-0

1-1-0

0-1-0

*Christiaan Bezuidenhout

1-0-1

0-0-0

0-0-1

1-0-0

Hideki Matsuyama

1-3-1

1-1-0

0-2-0

0-0-1

Mito Pereira

½

0-2-1

0-1-0

0-0-1

0-1-0

*Taylor Pendrith

0

0-4-0

0-1-0

0-2-0

0-1-0

Corey Conners

0

0-4-0

0-2-0

0-1-0

0-1-0

 

U.S. Team

Points

Overall

Foursomes

Four-ball

Singles

*Jordan Spieth

5

5-0-0

2-0-0

2-0-0

1-0-0

*Max Homa

4

4-0-0

2-0-0

1-0-0

1-0-0

Justin Thomas

4

4-1-0

2-0-0

2-0-0

0-1-0

Patrick Cantlay

3

3-1-0

1-0-0

1-1-0

1-0-0

Tony Finau

3

3-1-0

2-0-0

0-1-0

1-0-0

Xander Schauffele

3

3-1-0

1-0-0

1-1-0

1-0-0

*Collin Morikawa

2

2-1-0

1-1-0

0-0-0

1-0-0

*Cameron Young

1-2-1

1-1-0

0-0-1

0-1-0

Sam Burns

1

0-3-2

0-2-0

0-1-1

0-0-1

*Billy Horschel

1

1-2-0

0-0-0

1-1-0

0-1-0

*Kevin Kisner

½

0-2-1

0-0-0

0-1-1

0-1-0

Scottie Scheffler

½

0-3-1

0-2-0

0-0-1

0-1-0

 

*captain’s pick



 

PGA REACH Philadelphia's Third Annual Pro-Am Championship Raises Nearly $75,000


Field at Philadelphia Cricket Club, local community, help support foundation's mission to positively impact lives through the game of golf

 

Lower Gwynedd Township, Pa. (October 13, 2022) — On Tuesday, October 11, PGA REACH Philadelphia, the Philadelphia PGA Section's 501(c)(3) charitable arm, raised nearly $75,000 from its third annual pro-am championship on the Philadelphia Cricket Club's famed Wissahickon Course, which featured teams comprised of one PGA Professional and three amateur golfers. This year's pro-am proceeds, which set a new fundraising record for the event, will help support the foundation's Youth, Military, and Inclusion initiatives.

PGA REACH Philadelphia launched the annual event in 2020 to help support its Youth, Military, and Inclusion programming, and to spread the word about its mission to positively impact lives through the game of golf.

"We are ecstatic that our third pro-am championship was such a big success," said PGA REACH Philadelphia Director Courtney Curcio. "The support shown by our partners, players, and supporters, helped to make this year's event a record-breaker in terms of fundraising. It is truly wonderful to see that we will continue to make an impact on individuals and families within our community through our programming."

The 2022 PGA REACH Philadelphia Pro-Am Championship's Pillar-Level Partners are the Union League of Philadelphia, and Scott and Karen Hutchinson. Its Presenting Partners are American Floors Inc.Creative Financial GroupMedEast Post-Op & Surgical Inc.Parx CasinoSterling Cut GlassTrinity FlavorsValley Forge Tourisim & Convention BoardWilliam E. Howe & Co.Workhorse Brewing Company / Workhorse Tour, and Visit Delco, PA. The pro-am's gift partners included BirdieBoxCorkcicleSigns by the SeaAM&EPrecise Yardage Books, and Pairings Cigar Bar.

"This year's pro-am success shows that our foundation and its mission has been embraced by the local golf community," said Philadelphia PGA Section Executive Director Geoffrey Surrette, PGA. "Its because of their support that we will be able to expand and improve our programs in the coming season."

PGA REACH Philadelphia offers several programs to support local youth golfers, U.S. military veterans, and inclusion initiatives, including PGA Jr. LeagueGolf in SchoolsPGA HOPE Philadelphia (Helping Our Patriots Everywhere), the Philadelphia PGA Junior Tour Diversity Scholarship, Diversity Scholars Mentor Program, and PGA WORKS Fellowships.

On a picture-perfect autumn day, Philadelphia Cricket Club's historic A.W. Tillinghast layout received rave reviews from the participants. Indian Spring Country Club's Curtis Kirkpatrick, PGA, and his team of amateur golfers, Harris Kim, Chol Hur, and Anthonio Kim, finished with an impressive 16-under-par net score of 54 to claim victory over Philadelphia Country Club's Scott Reilly, PGA, Charles Bernicker, Addison West, and Graham Bachman, by two strokes. Jim Smith Jr., PGA, of the host club, and his team, Jacob Smith, Lee McManus, and Dan Levin, finished in third place at 13-under-par. To view the full 2022 PGA REACH Philadelphia Pro-Am Championship leaderboard, click here.

After competing in the event, PGA REACH Philadelphia Trustee Level Donors and pro-am Pillar-Level Partners Scott and Karen Hutchinson presented the foundation with an additional donation of $10,000. The foundation thanks Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson for their continued emphatic support of our mission and programs. 

A portion of the event's fundraising total came from the foundation's annual online auction, and a raffle to win a golf trip to Ireland, courtesy of our friends and partners at Celtic Golf.

PGA REACH Philadelphia is already planning next year's pro-am, which will take place at Galloway (N.J.) National Golf Club on Monday, October 16, 2023. Registration for next year's pro-am will open in the first quarter of 2023.

PGA REACH Philadelphia, the Philadelphia PGA Section, and its PGA Professionals, thank our partners, Boards of Directors, subcommittees, Philadelphia Cricket Club, its membership, management, and staff, as well as our PGA HOPE Philadelphia, PGA Jr. League, and Philadelphia PGA Junior Tour Diversity Scholarship volunteers, as the event would not have been possible without their support.

To learn more about PGA REACH Philadelphia, next year's pro-am, how you can support our mission, and to donate, visit PGAREACHPhiladelphia.com.

About PGA REACH Philadelphia 
PGA REACH Philadelphia is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization founded in 2018 as the charitable arm of the Philadelphia PGA Section, one of the 41 Sections within the PGA of America. PGA REACH Philadelphia is committed to serving our communities and growing the game of golf through our three pillars: Youth, Military, and Diversity. 

 

FRISCO, Texas and ORLANDO, Fla. (Jan. 25, 2023) - PGA Golf Professional of the Year Jeff Kiddie, PGA; Teacher & Coach of the Year Kevin Weeks, PGA; and PGA Golf Executive of the Year Bernie Friedrich, PGA headline the Class of 2023 PGA of America National Awards honorees. 

All 13 Award recipients will be announced at the 2023 PGA Show today at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, Florida, at 4 p.m. ET on the Industry Stage. Several of these recipients will be recognized during the ceremony. 

“It’s an incredible accomplishment to stand out as an honoree among nearly 28,000 PGA Professionals, as they are celebrated for furthering the business and game of golf,” said PGA President John Lindert. “Congratulations to our 13 National Award recipients for their inspirational dedication to the game. The PGA of America is proud to shed a spotlight on our Award winners and their amazing accomplishments, as they reflect the world-class expertise and talent of our Association.”

In addition, the recently announced 2022 PGA of America Professional Players of the Year presented by Rolex award recipients will be celebrated, including: Mens PGA Professional Player of the Year Michael Block of Mission Viejo, California; Women's PGA Professional Player of the Year Sandra Changkija of Kissimmee, Florida; and Senior PGA Professional Player of the Year Bob Sowards of Dublin, Ohio.
 

2023 PGA of America National Awards Recipients

Jeff Kiddie, PGA, Head Golf Professional at Aronimink Golf Club in Newtown Square, Pennsylvania, is the recipient of the 2023 PGA Golf Professional of the Year Award. This is the highest annual honor given to a PGA of America Professional, awarded for leadership, strong moral character and a substantial record of service to the Association and the game of golf.

A PGA Member for 23 years, Kiddie has spent the past 15 years at Aronimink following a seven-year stint at Applebrook Golf Club in Malvern, Pennsylvania, where he served as PGA General Manager and Head Golf Professional. Kiddie was the host PGA Professional during the 2020 KPMG Women’s PGA Championship at Aronimink, which will also host the 2026 PGA Championship. 

A longtime, dedicated leader in the Philadelphia PGA Section, Kiddie has held numerous positions including President, Vice President, Secretary, District Director, Director of Section Affairs and Member of the PGA of America Rules Committee, among others. In 2019, he was elected the 43rd President of the Philadelphia PGA; He served a two-year stint, followed by his current Honorary President role. 

A decorated PGA Professional, Kiddie has received numerous awards and accolades, including being honored as the national 2011 PGA Merchandiser of the Year – Private Facilities. He also received the Philadelphia PGA Section’s 2021 Bill Strausbaugh Award; 2016 Horton Smith Award (now the PGA Professional Development Award); 2011 Philadelphia Section Golf Professional of the Year; and is a two-time recipient of the Philadelphia PGA Section Merchandiser of the Year Award - Private Facilities (2007, ‘10).

Since Kiddie became a PGA Head Professional in 2001, a total of 12 of his Assistant Professionals have advanced to become Head Professionals across the country. His passion for the Rules of Golf has led him to become an instructor for PGA and USGA Rules of Golf Workshops. Kiddie is a graduate of Gannon University in Erie, Pennsylvania, where he competed on the golf team.

Kevin Weeks, PGA, an Illinois PGA Section Member and Director of Instruction at Cog Hill Golf & Country Club in Lemont, Illinois, is the 2023 PGA Teacher & Coach of the Year for his “outstanding services as a golf teacher, innovator and coach.” 

A PGA Member for 28 years, Weeks has been a mainstay on Golf Digest’s 50 Greatest Teachers and Best Teachers in Your State lists, joining the 50 Greatest list in 2012 and being recognized as the No. 1 Teacher in Illinois since 2017. Also featured regularly as one of GOLF Magazine’s Top 100 Teachers, Weeks is renowned for his putting expertise. His research on the game began in 1999 at Cog Hill, where he created a state-of-the-art putting facility with his patented Dynamic Impact Indicator (using lasers to measure the putter face at impact) and a Putting Robot that has been instrumental in numerous research projects, leading to several discoveries that have earned him opportunities to speak worldwide on the subject. The newest addition to the Lab is a GEARS 3-D motion capture system, which he uses to measure what each segment of the body is doing during the putting stroke.

Weeks’ students have captured 10 PGA TOUR victories and include notable names such as Kevin Streelman, Michael Bradley, Mark Wilson and several other top players. Weeks has also served as the swing coach for students who have won more than 50 professional mini tour events, 25 collegiate events, 11 American Junior Golf Association (AJGA) events and five high school state championships.

Growing the game has always been most important to Weeks, which is why when faced with the decision years ago of traveling with his students on the PGA TOUR or continuing to develop the nationally recognized PGA Jr. League program he built, the decision was easy. With its main goal of having “FUN,” the program now has 371 players. Cog Hill has qualified for the last six National Car Rental PGA Jr. League Championships (the only coach in the country to do so), as his program has been listed as a Game Changer Top 25 program for the past three years and is currently the second largest program in the country.

Weeks was named the Illinois PGA Teacher of the Year three times (2005, ‘07, ‘09). He earned a PGA Special Certification for Instruction in 2010, and became certified in the American Development Model (ADM) through PGA Coach in 2020. Weeks has also been honored as a Top 50 Growth of the Game Teacher Elite by the Golf Range Association of America and as a Top 50 Master Kids Coach by U.S. Kids Golf. After graduating from the University of Mississippi with a Bachelor’s Degree in Marketing, Weeks worked for Grand Cypress Resort, Canton Brookside Country Club and John Jacobs Golf Schools before joining the Cog Hill staff, where he’s built his career since 1997.

Bernie Friedrich, PGA, a Michigan PGA Section Member and the Senior Vice President of Golf Operations for Boyne Resorts in Petoskey, is the 2023 PGA Golf Executive of the Year. The honor recognizes outstanding services in an Executive Management position, as well as leadership, vision, courage, moral character and a substantial record of service to the Association and the game.

A PGA Member for nearly 40 years, Friedrich started as a Golf Professional at Boyne Resorts in 1976 and has been instrumental in leading the Company’s growing golf division. Today, Friedrich oversees Boyne Golf’s 13 courses and semi-private clubs in Michigan, Maine and Montana, including all staff, course agronomy and marketing nationwide, plus two golf membership groups—Bay Harbor Golf Club and Country Club of Boyne.

A multi-award-winning PGA Member at the Section level, Friedrich has been recognized as the Golf Professional of the Year twice (1998, 2001), Bill Strausbaugh Award recipient (2019), PGA Golf Executive of the Year (2021) and five times as Merchandiser of the Year (1990-’92, 1995-’96). In 2019, he was inducted into both the Michigan PGA Hall of Fame and the Michigan Golf Hall of Fame.

 

BRANSON, Mo. – Despite growing up in the South, I have never been much of a country music fan. Well, except for maybe Willie Nelson and a couple of others.  But most of the rock’n roll-y modern stuff?  Nah, not for me.

 

So I was a little surprised when I got a call a few weeks ago from golf industry public relations executive I’ve known for years inviting me on a golf trip to Branson, perhaps second only to Nashville as a mecca of country music.  Branson, he informed me, has made itself into something of a golf destination and the tourist bureau, Explore Branson, is trying to get the word out.  Hence, the call.

 

My initial thought was, “Uh, thanks, but no thanks.”  

 

But then the PR exec sent photos of the courses we’d play.  Much-ballyhooed Payne’s Valley, designed by Tiger Woods, was No. 1 on the list.  There was also a highly-touted Tom Fazio course called Buffalo Ridge, and a Coore & Crenshaw plum called Ozarks National.  Then there was a Jack Nicklaus nine-holer, and a 13-hole walking-only course designed by Gary Player.  

 

Best of all, in my mind, they are all mountain courses.  I love mountain golf.  I lived in the mountains of Virginia for a couple of years and mountain golf is as distinctive and addictive as seaside golf or desert golf or classic parkland golf, like the courses so plentiful and pleasurable here on the East Coast.  How had I overlooked the fact that Branson is in the heart of the Ozarks?

 

Suddenly, I was all in.  The Branson folks had only one expectation of me: If I came, I would write about the experience.  I had only one expectation as well: If I came, I would write what I actually thought, with no promise of sugar-coated PR puffery.

 

Agreed.

 

What Branson has to show off are 10 resort and daily fee courses within 20 minutes of each other, with an 11th course currently under construction.  Five of those 10 courses fall under the umbrella of Big Cedar Lodge, the vast, upscale resort and wilderness conservation sanctuary that is the baby of the area’s favorite local billionaire, Johnny Morris, founder and owner of Bass Pro Shops and, since 2017, Cabela’s, previously its competitor in the outdoor sporting goods industry.  Morris, who is still very much alive, vigorous and in charge at the age of 75, is a noted conservationist who has seen to it that each of his courses earned certifications from Audubon International.

 

There were five of us on the trip (six counting the PR exec) -- all writers and publishers from regional print and digital golf magazines and websites.  Besides me, members of the group hailed from Florida, Wisconsin, New England and Michigan.  Our handicaps ranged from a low of 3 (not me) to a high of 26 (not me). Nice guys and golf geeks, all, ranging in age from 49 (not me) to 72 (me).

 

 

Getting to Branson

 

Unless you’re arriving by private jet, Branson’s small airport (BKG) won’t do you much good.  Only Sun Country Airlines has a handful of commercial flights into Branson, mostly from around the Midwest. All others must fly commercial into Springfield-Branson National   (SFG), 50 minutes away in the state capital of Springfield, Mo.   Even that is a small airport, however, with only 10 gates, smaller even than Lehigh Valley National or Myrtle Beach. And good luck finding a non-stop flight into Springfield.  In my case, I flew through Charlotte going to Branson and Chicago (O’Hare) going home.  

 

The long day of traveling improved when we arrived at Big Cedar Lodge and checked into rustic but luxurious one- and two-bedroom cabins.  Nice digs – and all to myself. Sunset was fast approaching but there was still light enough to sit in a rocking chair on the balcony and gaze out over the hills and fairways of Payne’s Valley in the distance below.

 

For dinner, we headed up to the main Clubhouse and Mountain Top Grill, where we ate many meals over the nex t three days.  For me, the choice for dinner was easy – I love patty melts so any time they’re on the menu, I usually order it, even when it’s $26, like this one.  I didn’t regret my choice.

 

 

Monday

 

First morning, first round, we got right down to business, teeing it up at Payne’s Valley, the course I had most looked forward to playing.  

 

When it opened in 2020, not long after Tiger Woods quite unexpectedly won his fifth Masters, Payne’s Valley was promoted as an homage to the late U.S. Open winner Payne Stewart, a native son of Springfield. Although it wasn’t the first course Tiger designed, it was his first resort or daily fee course open to the public.  

 

As the crown jewel of the five Big Cedar courses, Payne’s Valley is a sight to behold.  The scale of it, the way it dominates and flows across the hillsides and valleys around the hilltop Lodge.  No surprise, a round at Payne’s Valley is not cheap.  In peak season, from mid-April to the end of October, green fees are $350 for Lodge guests and $450 for non-guests.  Even at those rates, Payne’s Valley is booked solid most of the year. (Rates.)

 

If I had any trepidation about Payne’s Valley, it was whether the world’s greatest golfer could design a golf course intended for us recreational hacks.  Could Tiger even remember what it’s like not to be able to carry an approach shot 180 yards over a greenside bunker?

 

It turns out Tiger was plenty prepared. My biggest take away from the round was that Tiger had conceived holes that certainly appeared intimidating and problematic but in most cases were quite user-friendly and manageable.  There were bunkers aplenty, for sure, but it felt like Tiger had strategically placed them so as to be more of a visually menacing than they actually were.  Plus, Tiger gave most every green an open front for running the ball up.

 

Despite heavy play, Payne’s Valley was one of the most immaculate, well-conditioned courses I have ever played.  Even on the tees on par 3s, it was hard to find divots, and I don’t think I saw a single fairway divot the whole day.  (Days later, back home, I watched YouTube videos from the early days of Payne’s Valley and the course wasn’t nearly so well-conditioned back then.)

 

(YouTube: No Laying Up at Payne’s Valley)

(YouTube: Tiger’s first resort course)

 

19th Hole

 

When Tiger got finished, there was enough leftover land for Johnny Morris to envision what Golf.com described as an “insane” par 3 bonus 19th hole.   Measuring from 88 to 134 yards, it begins from an elevated tee and plays down to a generous island green.   It’s an unforgettable hole to play, but the difficulty of the actual shot takes a back seat to the surrounding rock formations.

 

After you putt out and climb into your cart, what comes next is an unbelievable drive through rocks and tunnels, across small waterfalls, around hairpin turns, back up to the mountaintop clubhouse.  Even though it doesn’t count, the 19th is the most memorable hole.

 

(YouTube: Payne’s Valley 19th hole)

 

Niicklaus’ 9-hole, par 3 course

 

From Payne’s Valley we shuttled to nearby Top of the Rock, where Arnie’s Barn, a 150-year-old structure from Arnold Palmer’s property in Latrobe, Pa., has been transported, reassembled and expanded into a massive clubhouse-restaurant overlooking Table Rock Lake.  It is also the site of the Jack Nicklaus-designed 9-hole course, Top of the Rock.  If there was an unexpected highlight to the day – indeed, to the trip – it was this course.

 

Although it’s all par 3s, Top of the Rock is neither short nor a pushover.  The holes range from 142 to 202 yards.  The elevation changes make Top of the Rock impossible to walk but they also make for some breathtaking views and testy tee shots.

 

(YouTube: Top of the Rock)

 

I’ve played a few top-notch 9-hole, par 3 courses, most notably Pine Valley’s 10-hole par 3 short course, designed by Tom Fazio and ranked by Golfweek as the No. 1 par 3 course in America.  Golfweek ranks Top of the Rock as No. 8. It is the only par 3 course to be included as a venue on the PGA Champions Tour.  If you ask me, Top of the Rock should be ranked higher.

 

 

Dinner at Osage

 

Dinner that night was at one of Big Cedar Lodge’s premier restaurants, Osage, at Top of the Rock, which is, as the name suggests, at the top of a rock (mountain?), with spectacular views of Table Rock Lake. Each evening at sunset, resort guests and diners are treated to a solemn enactment of a military cannon-firing, complete with a loud ka-boom and billows of smoke.

 

The view from the mountaintop restaurant is nothing short of dazzling, with its commanding view of the lake, the hills and the golf courses below.  You’d have a hard time finding a better spot to watch a sunset.

 

Osage Restaurant, like Payne’s Valley, is not cheap.  Of course, if you didn’t gulp at the room rates, or the green fees, you probably won’t blanch at the prices on the menu.  Osage earned its reputation as a steak house so I naturally ordered the 8-ounce filet, medium rare. It cost $68.  The filet was good -- not $68 good.  A Caesar salad was $16.  Soup, at $17, felt overly indulgent, so I passed.  Wine was $14 a glass. (Osage dinner menu)

 

 

Tuesday Buffalo Ridge

 

In the same way that Steven Spielberg directs big-budget blockbuster movies, Tom Fazio designs big-budget, blockbuster golf courses, among them Buffalo Ridge at Big Cedar. Fazio’s courses take possession of a piece of land -- in this case, more hills and hillsides, jagged rock formations, ponds, creeks, streams, waterfalls and dramatic shifts in elevation.

 

It opens with a downhill par 5 with a fairway as wide as an eight-lane highway. What follows is a magnificent piece of land and Fazio spares no expense in carving his imprint into the landscape, with his signature sweeping, sloping fairways, dungeon-like fairway bunkers and greens that can make you look like a fool.

 

(YouTube: Buffalo Ridge)

 

True, there are people who hate those kind of courses, which they argue are just too much, too over the top.  Those people tend to like more subdued, walkable courses, and they regard Fazio as the worst offender when it comes to excesses.  Personally, I like Tom Fazio courses, including this one. So do plenty of other golfers, based on the rankings of Fazio’s many courses in magazine Top 100 lists.  Fazio courses have a familiar sort of Fazio feel. Buffalo Ridge is no exception.

 

Fazio was also impressed by the piece of land he was given to work with.  Right there on the Buffalo Ridge website, there’s a quote from Fazio:  “This property at Buffalo Ridge is even grander than what anyone can imagine.   I’m shocked…Every time I come here is am amazed.”

 

That night for dinner at the Mountain Top Grill, I opted for lighter fare – crab cakes and a Caesar salad.  Let’s just say I’ve had better crab cakes but it was still a good call.  

 

Wednesday

 

The third of our Big Cedar courses was Ozarks National, a Bill Coore-Ben Crenshaw design that was named Best New Public Course in the country by Golf Digest in 2019 and Best You Can Play in Missouri by Golfweek in 2020.  LINKS magazine includes it as one Coore & Crenshaw’s 10 best public courses.

 

Coore & Crenshaw are among the most revered and in-demand architects working today (along with Fazio, Tom Doak and Gil Hanse).  Closer to home, Coore & Crenshaw designed Hidden Creek GC at the Jersey Shore; elsewhere, they are responsible for a slew of top-rated courses, including  Cabot Cliffs, Sand Hills, Streamsong Red and three at Bandon Dunes)

 

Given those successes, if you had told me going in that I would rank their course third among the three Big Cedar courses we played, I might have been skeptical.  Don’t get me wrong, Ozarks National is absolutely top-drawer. Set among imposing limestone formations, boulders and enormous sinkholes, the course skips across mountain ridges, providing yet more stunning views and vistas. Really, there is not a bad view on the course.

 

(YouTube: Ozarks National)

 

After three comfy nights in the Payne’s Valley Golf Cottage at Big Cedar Lodge, we checked out Wednesday morning before we headed for Ozarks National.  Next stop, after golf, the Hilton Branson Convention Center Hotel. Located between historic downtown Branson and modern, waterfront Branson Landing, it’s an alternative lodging option for those not staying at Big Cedar.  

 

As nice as the Big Cedar Lodge cabin was, the room at the Hilton was hardly a step down.  My top-floor room with a picture window view turned out to include a living room, kitchenette, bedroom, and two bathrooms, one with a hot tub and walk-in shower.  I don’t believe I have ever had a hotel room with two bathrooms.

 

That night, we ate at the Hilton’s restaurant, a steak house called Level 2.  Again, at the recommendation of the chef, I went for the filet mignon.  This 9-ounce filet was in a different league from the one two nights ago. Melted in my mouth.  It was, no exaggeration, one of the best steaks I’ve ever eaten. (Level 2 dinner menu)

 

Thursday

 

On our final day of golf, we set out for nearby Branson Hills Golf Club. After three days playing the resort courses at Big Cedar, Branson Hills felt more like a first-class but ordinary daily fee golf course.  There’s nothing ordinary about it.

 

(Course video)

 

Designed by Chuck Smith and former PGA Tour player/CBS broadcaster Bobby Clampett, Branson Hills opened in 2009 as Payne Stewart Golf Club, as a homage to the native son.  Back then, before they started building courses at Big Cedar, Payne Stewart GC/Branson Hills was ranked as the No. 1 Course in Missouri by Golfweek for seven straight years.  While it’s not cheap (in-season peak rates are $160), it’s certainly cheaper than the Big Cedar courses.

 

Like every course we played, the personality of Branson Hills’ is a function of the topography, which is, after all, the Ozarks Mountains.  The Ozarks, with a peak elevation of about 2,500 feet, are much smaller mountains than the Rockies (14,400 ft.) or even the Blue Ridge Mountains (6,600 ft.). The Ozarks are more on the scale of the Poconos (2,500 ft.).

 

Overview

 

Until this golf trip, I knew almost nothing about this part of the country.  I’d passed through once or twice but I had no sense of the place.  I’d watched every episode of Ozarks, the popular Netflix series, but, truth be told, that show is filmed outside of Atlanta.

 

On this five-day trip, I got a better look. I liked the place and the people.  Branson is as Middle America as it gets.  Although Branson is only minutes from the Arkansas state line, it didn’t feel like the Deep South, where I lived for the first 25 years of my life.  And much to my surprise, I got through the trip without having to actively avoid country music.

 

The golf was great.  I wouldn’t call Branson a full-blown golf destination on the order of, say, Pinehurst, Myrtle Beach or Bandon Dunes.  But Branson has a six-pack of wonderful courses and another four or five that won’t disappoint.  Big Cedar Lodge and Top of the Rock were, well, top of the rock.

 

BRANSON, Mo. – Despite growing up in the South, I have never been much of a country music fan. Well, except for maybe Willie Nelson and a couple of others.  But most of the rock’n roll-y modern stuff?  Nah, not for me.

 

So I was a little surprised when I got a call a few weeks ago from golf industry public relations executive I’ve known for years. He was inviting me on a golf trip to Branson, perhaps second only to Nashville as a mecca of country music.  Branson, he informed me, has made itself into something of a golf destination.  The tourist bureau, Explore Branson, is trying to get the word out.  Hence, the call.

 

My initial thought was, “Thanks, but no thanks.”  

 

But then the PR exec sent photos of the courses we’d play  -- Payne’s Valley, designed by Tiger Woods, was No. 1 on the list.  There was also a highly-touted Tom Fazio course called Buffalo Ridge, and a Coore & Crenshaw layout called Ozarks National.  Then there was a Jack Nicklaus nine-holer, and a 13-hole walking-only course designed by Gary Player.   

 

Best of all, in my mind, they are all mountain courses.  I love mountain golf.  I lived in the mountains of Virginia for a couple of years and mountain golf is as distinctive and addictive as seaside golf or desert golf or classic parkland golf, like the courses so plentiful and pleasurable here on the East Coast.  How had I overlooked the fact that Branson is in the heart of the Ozarks?

 

Suddenly, I was all in.  The Branson folks had only one expectation of me: If I came, I would write about the experience.  I had only one expectation as well: If I came, I would write what I actually thought, with no promise of sugar-coated PR puffery.

 

Agreed.

 

What Branson has to show off are 10 resort and daily fee courses within 20 minutes of each other, with an 11th course currently under construction.  Five of those 10 courses fall under the umbrella of Big Cedar Lodge, the vast, upscale resort and wilderness conservation sanctuary that is the baby of the area’s favorite local billionaire, Johnny Morris, founder and owner of Bass Pro Shops and, since 2017, Cabela’s, previously its competitor in the outdoor sporting goods industry.  Morris, who is still very much alive, vigorous and in charge at the age of 75, is a noted conservationist who has seen to it that each of his courses earned certifications from Audubon International.

 

There were five of us on the trip – six counting the PR exec – all writers and publishers from regional print and digital golf magazines and websites.  Besides me, members of the group hailed from Florida, Wisconsin, New England and Michigan.  Our handicaps ranged from a low of 3 (not me) to a high of 26 (not me). Nice guys and golf geeks, all, ranging in age from 49 (not me) to 72 (me).

 

 

 

Getting to Branson

 

Unless you’re arriving by private jet, Branson’s small airport doesn’t do you much good.  All others must fly commercial, likely into Springfield-Branson National, an hour away in the state capital of Springfield, Mo.   Even that is a small airport, however, with only 10 gates, smaller even than Lehigh Valley National or Myrtle Beach. Good luck finding a non-stop flight into Springfield.  In my case, I flew through Charlotte going to Branson and Chicago (O’Hare) coming home. 

 

The long day of traveling improved when we arrived at Big Cedar Lodge and we checked into rustic but luxurious one- and two-bedroom cabins.  Nice digs – and all to myself. Sunset was fast approaching but there was still light enough to sit in a rocking chair on the balcony and gaze out over the hills and fairways of Payne’s Valley in the distance below.

 

For dinner, we headed up to the main Clubhouse and Mountain Top Grill, where we ate many meals.  For me, the choice for dinner was easy – I love patty melts so any time they’re on the menu, I usually order it, even when it’s $26, like this one.  I didn’t regret my choice.

 

 

Monday

 

First morning, first round, we got right down to business, teeing it up at Payne’s Valley, the course I had most looked forward to playing.  

 

When it opened in 2020, not long after Tiger Woods quite unexpectedly won his fifth Masters, Payne’s Valley was promoted as an homage to the late U.S. Open winner Payne Stewart, a native son of Springfield. Although it wasn’t the first course Tiger designed, it was his first resort or daily fee course open to the public. 

 

As the crown jewel of the five Big Cedar courses, Payne’s Valley is a sight to behold.  The scale of it, the way it dominates and flows across the hillsides and valleys around the hilltop Lodge.  No surprise, a round at Payne’s Valley ain’t cheap.  In peak season, from mid-April to the end of October, green fees are $350 for Lodge guests and $450 for non-guests.  Even at those prices, Payne’s Valley is booked solid most of the year. (Rates.)

 

If I had any trepidation over Payne’s Valley, it was whether the world’s greatest golfer could design a golf course intended for us recreational hacks.  Could Tiger even remember what it’s like not to be able to carry an approach shot 180 yards over a greenside bunker?

 

It turns out Tiger was plenty prepared. My biggest take away from the round was that Tiger had conceived holes that certainly appeared intimidating and problematic but in most cases were quite user-friendly and manageable.  There were bunkers aplenty, for sure, but it felt like Tiger had strategically placed them so as to be more of a visually menacing than they actually were.  Plus, Tiger gave most every green an open front for running the ball up.

 

Despite heavy play, Payne’s Valley was one of the most immaculate, well-conditioned courses I have ever played.  Even on the tees on par 3s, it was hard to find divots, and I don’t think I saw a single fairway divot the whole day.  (Days later, back home, I watched YouTube videos from the early days of Payne’s Valley and the course wasn’t nearly so well-conditioned back then.)

 

(YouTube: No Laying Up at Payne’s Valley)

(YouTube: Tiger’s first resort course)

 

19th Hole

 

When Tiger got finished, there was enough leftover land for Johnny Morris to envision what Golf.com described as an “insane” par 3 bonus 19th hole.   Measuring anywhere from 88 to 134 yards, it starts from from an elevated tee and plays down to a generous island green.   It’s an unforgettable hole to play, but the difficulty of the actual shot takes a back seat to the surrounding rock formations.

 

After you putt out and climb into your cart, what comes next is an unbelievable drive through rocks and tunnels, across small waterfalls, around hairpin turns, back up to the mountaintop clubhouse.  Even though it doesn’t count, the 19th is the most memorable hole.

 

(YouTube: Payne’s Valley 19th hole)

 

Niicklaus’ 9-hole, par 3 course

 

From Payne’s Valley we shuttled to nearby Top of the Rock, where Arnie’s Barn, a 150-year-old structure from Arnold Palmer’s property in Latrobe, Pa., has been transported, reassembled and expanded into a massive clubhouse-restaurant overlooking Table Rock Lake.  It is also the site of the Jack Nicklaus-designed 9-hole course, Top of the Rock.  If there was an unexpected highlight to the day – indeed, to the trip – it was this course.

 

Although it’s all par 3s, Top of the Rock is neither short nor a pushover.  The holes range from 142 to 202 yards.  The elevation changes make Top of the Rock impossible to walk but they also make for some breathtaking views and testy tee shots.

 

(YouTube: Top of the Rock)

 

I’ve played a few top-notch 9-hole, par 3 courses, starting with Pine Valley’s 10-hole par 3 short course, designed by Tom Fazio and ranked by Golfweek as the No. 1 par 3 course in America.  Golfweek ranks Top of the Rock as No. 8. It is the only par 3 course to be included as a venue on the PGA Champions Tour.  If you ask me, Top of the Rock should be ranked higher.

 

Dinner at Osage

 

Dinner that night was at one of Big Cedar Lodge’s premier restaurants, Osage, at Top of the Rock, which is, as the name suggests, at the top of a rock (mountain?), with spectacular views of Table Rock Lake. Each evening at sunset, resort guests and diners are treated to a solemn enactment of a military cannon-firing, complete with a loud ka-boom and billows of smoke.

 

The view from the mountaintop restaurant is nothing short of dazzling, with its commanding view of the lake, the hills and the golf courses below.  You’d have a hard time finding a better spot to watch a sunset.

 

Osage Restaurant, like Payne’s Valley, is not cheap.  Of course, if you didn’t gulp at the room rates, or the green fees, you probably won’t blanch at the prices on the menu.  Osage’s reputation is as a steak house so I naturally ordered the 8-ounce filet, medium rare. It cost $68.  The filet was good -- not $68 good, but good.  A Caesar salad was $16.  Soup, at $17, felt overly indulgent, so I passed.  Two glasses of wine was $38. (Osage dinner menu)

 

 

Tuesday Buffalo Ridge

 

In the same way that Steven Spielberg directs big-budget blockbuster movies, Tom Fazio designs big-budget, blockbuster golf courses, including Buffalo Ridge at Big Cedar. Fazio’s courses take possession of a piece of land -- in this case more hills and hillsides, jagged rock formations, ponds, creeks, streams, waterfalls and dramatic shifts in elevation.

 

It opens with a downhill par 5 with a fairway as wide as an eight-lane highway. What follows is a magnificent piece of land and Fazio spares no expense in carving his imprint into the landscape, with his signature sweeping, sloping fairways, dungeon-like fairway bunkers and greens that can make you look like a fool.

(YouTube: Buffalo Ridge)

 

True, there are people who hate those kind of courses, which they argue are just too much, too over the top.  Those people tend to like more subdued, walkable courses, and they regard Fazio as the worst offender when it comes to excesses.  Personally, I like Tom Fazio courses, including this one. So do plenty of other golfers, based on the rankings of Fazio’s many courses in magazine Top 100 lists.  Fazio courses have a familiar sort of Fazio feel. Buffalo Ridge is no exception.

 

Fazio was also impressed by the piece of land he was given to work with.  Right there on the Buffalo Ridge website, there’s a quote from Fazio:  “This property at Buffalo Ridge is even grander than what anyone can imagine.   I’m shocked…Every time I come here is am amazed.”

 

That night for dinner at the Mountain Top Grill, I opted for lighter fare – crab cakes and a Caesar salad.  Let’s just say I’ve had better crab cakes but it was still a good call. 

 

Wednesday

 

The third of our Big Cedar courses was Ozarks National, a Bill Coore-Ben Crenshaw design that was named Best New Public Course in the country by Golf Digest in 2019 and Best You Can Play in Missouri by Golfweek in 2020.  LINKS magazine includes it as one Coore & Crenshaw’s 10 best public courses.

 

Coore & Crenshaw are among the most revered and in-demand architects working today (along with Fazio, Tom Doak and Gil Hanse).  Closer to home, Coore & Crenshaw designed Hidden Creek GC at the Jersey Shore; elsewhere, a slew of top-rated courses, including  Cabot Cliffs, Sand Hills, Streamsong Red and three at Bandon Dunes)

 

Given those successes, if you had told me going in that I would rank their course third among the three Big Cedar courses we played, I might have been dubious.  Don’t get me wrong, Ozarks National is absolutely top-drawer. Set among imposing limestone formations, boulders and enormous sinkholes, the course skips across a series ridges of the Ozarks, providing yet more stunning views and vistas.  Really, there’s not a bad view on the course.

 

(YouTube: Ozarks National)

 

After three comfy nights in the cabin at Big Cedar Lodge, we checked out Wednesday morning before we headed for Ozarks National.  Next stop, after golf, the Hilton Branson Convention Center Hotel, in the heart of downtown Branson and a mere flip wedge from the Branson waterfront and riverwalk.

 

As nice as the Big Cedar Lodge cabin the room at the Hilton was hardly a step down.  My top-floor room with a view turned out to include a living room, kitchenette, bedroom, and two bathrooms, one with a hot tub and walk-in shower.  I don’t believe I have ever had a hotel room with two bathrooms.

 

That night, we ate at the Hilton’s restaurant, a steak house called Level 2.  Again, at the recommendation of the chef, I went for the filet mignon.  This 9-ounce filet was in a different league from the one two nights ago. Melted in my mouth.  It was, no exaggeration, one of the best steaks I’ve ever eaten. (Level 2 dinner menu)

 

 

Thursday

 

On our final day of golf, we set out for a nearby local daily fee course, Branson Hills Golf Club. After three days playing the resort courses at Big Cedar, Branson Hills felt more like an first-class but ordinary daily fee golf course.  There’s nothing ordinary about it.

 

(Course video)

 

Designed by Chuck Smith and former PGA Tour player/CBS broadcaster Bobby Clampett, Branson Hillst opened in 2009 as Payne Stewart Golf Club, as a homage to the native son.  Back then, before they started building courses at Big Cedar, Payne Stewart GC/Branson Hills was ranked as the No. 1 Course in Missouri by Golfweek for seven straight years.  While it’s not cheap (in-season peak rates are $160), it’s certainly cheaper than the Big Cedar courses.

 

Like every course we played, the personality of Branson Hills’ is a function of the topography, which is, after all, the Ozarks Mountains.  The Ozarks, with a peak elevation of about 2,500 feet, are much smaller mountains than the Rockies (14,400 ft.) or even the Blue Ridge Mountains (6,600 ft.). The Ozarks are more on the scale of the Poconos (2,500 ft.).

 

Overview

 

Until this golf trip, I knew almost nothing about this part of the country.  I’d passed through once or twice but I had no sense of the place.  I’d watched every episode of Ozarks, the popular Netflix series, but, truth be told, that show is filmed outside of Atlanta.

 

On this five-day trip, I got a better look.  I liked what I saw and the people I met.  Branson is as Middle America as it gets.  Although Branson is only minutes from the Arkansas state line, it didn’t feel like the Deep South, where I lived for more than two decades,  Much to my surprise, I got through five days without getting an earful of country music.  Oh, trust me, the country music is here, in the clubs and showcase venues, but I didn’t go looking for it and it didn’t find me.

 

The golf was great.  I wouldn’t call Branson a full-blown golf destination on the order of, say, Pinehurst, Myrtle Beach or Bandon Dunes.  But Branson’s got a six-pack of wonderful courses and another four or five that won’t disappoint.  Big Cedar Lodge and Top of the Rock were, well, top of the rock.

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 


Send to a friend
Share
0 Comments  |  0 Pending  |  Add a Comment  |  Write a Review  
 


 
MyPhillyGolf.com
  About MyPhillyGolf
  Blog Archives
  Photos
  Reviews
Special Features
  Advertise with Us
  Course Finder
Links to Other Golf Sites
  PGA Tour
  Philadelphia PGA
  Philly Publinks
  European Tour
  Schedules
   © 2024 MyPhillyGolf.com All Rights Reserved
   Privacy Policy | Terms of UseDeveloped by AppNet Solutions